Cassandra has moved. Ugo Bardi publishes now on a new site called "The Seneca Effect."

Sunday, October 21, 2012

Breaking news: hot revelations from the black box of the sunken Costa Concordia


The cruise ship "Costa Concordia" hit a reef in January 2012 and partly sunk in front of the Giglio Island, off the coast of Tuscany in the Mediterranean Sea. There were more than 30 victims among passengers. A criminal trial is in progress in Italy against the ship's captain, Mr. Schettino, and other officers, accused of manslaughter, negligence and incompetence. The following text is translated and adapted from the Italian blog "Attack on Earth"


Breaking news: exclusive revelations from the black box of the "Costa Concordia." What was said on deck during the accident.


- There is no proof that there are reefs in this area.

- Even if there were reefs, there is no proof that they could damage the hull of the ship.

- So what? There have always been reefs in the sea!

- Astronomers have discovered that there are reefs also on Mars and Jupiter!

- The previous captain promised to you to watch out for reefs. I promise to you that the ship restaurants will always serve great meals!

- We have e-mail messages from the Chief Mate that show that officers altered the data to show that the risk from reefs could be larger than what it is in reality.

- Stop looking at that stupid sonar! Why don't you look up, instead? Don't you see all those chemtrails? They keep trying to exterminate us!

- Changing course is expensive. Let's keep going this way; in any case we'll mitigate any possible damage.

- Are we sure that the ship is really sinking?

- After the Great Flood, God didn't let Noah's ark sink. Why should He allow the Costa Concordia to sink?

- The best strategy is always adaptation. After all, most passengers can swim.

Who

Ugo Bardi is a member of the Club of Rome, faculty member of the University of Florence, and the author of "Extracted" (Chelsea Green 2014), "The Seneca Effect" (Springer 2017), and Before the Collapse (Springer 2019)